Following your conviction for a federal crime in Ohio County (and the subsequent payment of your debt to society), you will re-enter the community ready to enjoy the many rights and privileges you did previously. However, having a federal conviction on your record prevents your regaining certain rights (such as voting in an election or owning a firearm). It might also make it difficult to secure housing or find a job. Fully regaining your previous civic stature may be possible if you are able to secure a presidential pardon. Is that possible, and if so, how would you go about securing it? 

The Office of the President of the United States receives countless requests for pardons every year, and only a relatively small amount of those are granted. Yet if you have a strong case to present, you could find yourself amongst those lucky few. According to the U.S. Justice Department, you must wait a minimum of five years from either the date your confinement ended (or the date you were sentenced if you were not confined) in order for your petition to be considered. Petitions for pardons are to be submitted to the Office of the Pardon Attorney, who will then turn your case over to the Attorney General’s Office for review. After an investigation, your petition is then turned over to the President (with the Attorney General’s recommendations) for final review. 

Can you increase your chances of getting a pardon? Given that a pardon is essentially a legal form of forgiveness, your willingness to be forthright in your reasons for seeking a pardon (as opposed to deflecting responsibility for your conviction) may go far in supporting your case. Such a tip should not be viewed as legal counsel, but rather simple advice to help improve your chances.