The common assumption held by most in Ohio County may be that in order to be charged with a crime, one’s words must be supported by actions. One can talk about engaging in allegedly criminal activity, but unless they actually progress into doing it, they have done nothing. In some cases, that is not necessarily true. The details on what words and scenarios the state defines as meeting the standard of making terroristic threats have been detailed on this blog in the past. As has been mentioned, intent plays a key role in charging someone with this offense. 

Jefferson County authorities likely believe such intent did indeed exist in the case of a local resident. The man was taken into custody for making terroristic threats on social media. According to reports, he posted that he was a “ticking time bomb” that was capable of hurting other people. After having been alerted to these threats, local officials searched the man’s home and allegedly found evidence that suggested to them that the man was indeed capable of causing harm. His supposed threats, however, where reportedly not made against anyone in particular, but were rather stated in general. 

Such is the problem with prosecuting cases like this. Even in instances where authorities may believe that a person has the capacity to cause harm (and said individual has even expressed a desire to), it could reasonably be argued that without there words being directed at a single person (or group of people), they are little more than just that. Proving such a point on one’s own, however, may be difficult. Such an argument might be easier to make if one has the assistance of an experienced criminal defense attorney to rely on.